Ely, Jesse and Robin’s Guide to Asexuality

cover3 Ely, Jesse and Robin’s Guide to Asexuality is although an informative piece of writing is also a humourist and touching story of three boys who just about know what they want to do with their lives.

Ely is 16, homoromantic and when he leaves school he wants to go into Art. He is currently dating the physically attractive Joel who believes that sex is what makes a relationship a adults relationship, Ely doesn’t completely know how to tell Joel he doesn’t think sex is all that. But when he gets a health scare the whole truth comes out.

Jesse is 16, and planning to stay on and study for his A-Levels. Jesse lives with his dad and his dad’s partner Patrick, they got together when Jesse was 11 when his dad was emitted into hospital due to his HIV, but Jesse hasn’t quite moved on from those few months when he was 11 and still is wary of his dad’s situation.

Robin is 16 and when he leaves school he plans to leave home at the same time. Robin’s parents are Foster Carers and his house is like the Dumping Ground, there’s new kids there every week and Robin hates it, all Robin does is crave attention from his parents but when a new girl comes to his house his feelings for her begin to confuse him and he no longer knows exactly what he wants to do in his life.

Ely, Jesse and Robin’s guide to Asexuality shows three very different asexuals handling three very different situations, no two boys are the same, the only thing they agree on is their lack of interest in sex.

 

Glossary!

  • aromantic; lack of romantic attraction towards anyone
  • biromantic; as opposed to bisexual
  • heteroromantic; as opposed to heterosexual
  • homoromantic; as opposed to homosexual
  • panromantic; as opposed to pansexual
  • demiromantic or demisexual; a person who may identify as “grey romantic” or a “grey asexual”, respectively, because they may feel romantic attraction or sexual attraction once a reasonably stable or large emotional connection has been created.

R.J.

 

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Filed under Books, LGBT

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